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How Much Daily Fruit Should You Consume?

One of my favorite blogs to read is HeartScanBlog.com, by Dr. William Davis, a cardiologist in Wisconsin.

Dr. Davis is a big advocate of eliminating wheat from your diet, in order to have a healthy heart and minimize the risk of diabetes, among other things.

One of his older blog posts I recently read talks about the consumption of fruit and diabetes:
While fruit is certainly better than, say, a half-cup of gummy bears (84.06 g carbohydrates, 50.12 g sugars), fruit is unavoidably high in carbohydrates and sugars.

Take a look at the carbohydrate content of some common fruits:

Apple, 1 medium (2-3/4" dia)
19.06 g carbohydrate (14.34 g sugar)

Banana, 1 medium (7" to 7-7/8" long)
26.95 g carbohydrate (14.43 g sugar)

Grapes, 1 cup
27.33 g carbohydrate (23.37 g sugar)

Pear, 1 medium
25.66 g carbohydrate (16.27 g sugar)

Source: USDA Food and Nutrient Database

Fruit has many healthy components, of course, such as fiber, flavonoids, and vitamin C. But it also comes with plenty of sugar. This is especially true of modern fruit, the sort that has been cultivated, hybridized, fertilized, gassed, etc. for size and sugar content.

When you hear such conventional advice like "eat plenty of fruits and vegetables," you should hear instead: "eat plenty of vegetables. Eat a small quantity of fruit."
I used to love bananas, watermelon and other high carbohydrate fruits. But the more I learn about the effects of too much natural sugar on our health, the less fruit I consume. Now I pretty much only eat berries, which are low carbohydrate.

Yet, fruits are loaded with antioxidants (cancer fighters) and phytochemicals (plant medicines), both necessary for good health. So what can you do, especially if you have diabetic tendencies?

One option to consider is BarleyLife Xtra, a fruit and vegetable supplement that comes in a powder. Because the water and fiber are removed through a juicing process, you get the benefits of the fruits, without all the high-carb sugar.